1st Army-Navy Game in 1891, by Walter Camp 120 Years Ago

November, 1891 – Outing Magazine

Walter Camp Reports on the First Army-Navy Game

… Speaking of the importation of the game leads us to a new phase and one which promises even a more extended progress of the game than that through the schools and colleges. In 1890 a match was instituted between Annapolis and West Point and the enthusiasm provoked was remarkable. The West Point men had not enjoyed the same privileges as their more fortunate opponents in the way of previous outside matches, nor had they played the game in preceding years, as had the Annapolis men. In spite of these odds they put up a very plucky fight, and it is safe to say that if the game once obtains a foothold among these men its fascinations will make themselves felt so strongly as to perpetuate it wherever they go.

These men are making a study of the art of war, and there is no sport known that in its very nature so mimics that art as the game of football. The tactics, the formations, the strategies, the attack and defense, all belong equally to the military commander and the football captain.

English and American commanders have both recognized the similarity of the football tactics to the tactics of war, and more than one has said that a good football player will make a good soldier….

From “The Lost Century of American Football” – www.LostCentury.com

Army-Navy Football 119 Years Ago Today, Dec. 10, 1892

Army-Navy Football Game Image 119 Years Ago Today!

Army-Navy Football Game Image from Harper's Weekly, Dec. 10, 1892

From “The Lost Century of American Football” – www.LostCentury.com

Harvard vs Yale Football 136 Years Ago, Rules of the Game

November 13, 1875, Saturday – The Boston Daily Globe

FOOTBALL GAME BETWEEN HARVARD AND YALE TODAY

The Harvard foot-ball team of fifteen men left for New Haven yesterday to play the Yales today. As a special reduction of railroad fares had been effected, quite a number of Harvard men accompanied the team. They will be the guests of the Yales at the New Haven House and will return home early tomorrow morning.

The team is composed of the following persons: Morse, ’74; Faucon, ’75; Bacon andHull, ’76, Cate, Seamans, Curtis, Cushing, Keyes,Leeds, Tower and Herrick, ’77; Thayer and Wetherbee, ’78; and Blanchard, ’79. Owing to an injury received last spring and aggravated this fall, Mr. Whiting will not play, but will accompany the team and probably act as umpire.

Concessionary rules have been adopted which make the game neither Rugby, Harvard, nor Yale. There are to be no “have it downs,” no “touch-downs,” no distinction between a “drop” and a “punt kick.” Any kind of a kick over the pole is a goal.

Captain Whiting has kept his men in good practice since the games with Tufts and Montreal, and the Yales have long been contemplating this game, some fine sport may be expected.

From “The Lost Century of American Football” – www.LostCentury.com

“Football of Today” 119 Years Ago, Nov. 7, 1892

November 7, 1892, MondayThe Herald: Syracuse, New York

FOOTBALL OF TODAY

Development of the Game Into a Strategic Battle

BRAINS BACKED BY MUSCLE

Mind of More Account Than Matter, but Both Play Their Part in Modern Football

If the weather is at all pleasant next Wednesday it is quite probable that a large majority of the 5,000 people who have been sent invitations will go down to Star park to witness the game of foot ball between the Syracuse Athletic Association and the Syracuse University teams.

Although foot ball as it is played to-day is after a careful comparison with other out door sports conceded to be the brainiest and manliest of them all comparatively few people have been able to master the mysteries of the game for the simple reason that if one is unfamiliar with the rules and reasons of play and the scientific variations which a crafty captain will signal to his team under varying conditions, it all looks like a shoving match between eleven men with an occasional run or kick to relieve the monotony.

But when once the spectator is able to put himself mentally in the place of the captain and reason why this or that play is feasible, whether one man or another should at such a time choose to hurl himself through the opposing eleven or try to run around them, the game becomes as interesting as a strategic battle between two armies. It becomes not an individual “scrapping” match between eleven men to advance the ball to one goal or the other, but a battle of brains between two captains, backed by the brawn and instant obedience of the team as a whole.

There was a day when individual playing was much thought of. Now-a-days team work is what wins, unless the disparity in weight is so great as to utterly demolish an opposing line.

The game of to-day as it is played in Syracuse is by no means the game that was played last year or the year before. Fastidious folk who were shocked by accounts of fistic encounters that went by the name of foot ball games will see nothing of the sort in the games that are played at Star park this season.

So far there has not been a single “slugging” match and games are conducted in scientific and gentlemanly fashion.

To be sure, the game is rough, but then it must be remembered that the players are all in the finest muscular trim by long and severe training and by the most exemplary habits of living, and that they are protected from injury by heavily padded jackets and pants, and by nose and shin guards and rubber bands.

From “The Lost Century of American Football

Carlisle Native American Football Team 114 Years Ago

November 4, 1897

COACHING THE CARLISLE INDIANS AT FOOT-BALL

COACHING THE CARLISLE INDIANS AT FOOT-BALL

COACHING THE CARLISLE INDIANS AT FOOT-BALL

The strength, spirit, and enthusiasm of the play of the famous Indian foot-ball team from the school at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, is the most interesting feature to-day in the foot-ball world. Their condition is so amazing that they play from beginning to end without appreciable loss of strength. Almost without armor, they move with a dash and quickness unequaled by any of their opponents. When the university men call time, so as to patch up wounds, take refreshments, and catch breath, the Indians throw handsprings and turn somersaults.

In this picture Mr. W. T. Bull, formerly a noted full-back at Yale, is teaching the backs of the Indian team how they should plunge through the line when an opening has been made between centre and guard. The group in the background of the picture is composed of players and substitutes taking note of the lesson. These Indians have learned all of the old university tricks and have others invented for them by Mr. Bull. There is little doubt that they can beat all the teams in the country except those of Princeton, Yale, Harvard, and Pennsylvania, and possibly Cornell.

From “The Lost Century of American Football

Sports on Sunday a Sin in 1874 — Oops, We Changed Our Mind!

October 23, 1874, Friday – The Bulletin, Cairo, Illinois

The weather permitting there will be another game of base ball played in the Fifth ward on next Sunday; and also a game of foot ball. The whole to be concluded by a rousing fight. These kind of amusements are becoming very fashionable; and yet our good Christian people do nothing to prevent them. They ought to pray for a change. This is not, we are sure, asking too much of them. We do not wish to trouble them, but really this matter ought to be attended to, and it seems to us they are the people to attend to it.

October 24, 1874, Saturday – The Bulletin, Cairo, Illinois

It seems that we have been misunderstood. Several sinners have called upon us and remarked that base ball is not a sin and that foot ball is a virtue; that therefore it is not a sin to play these games on Sunday. This we admit. In our belief Sunday is a day of recreation, and if recreation can be had at base ball or foot ball or any other kind of ball, we have no objections to urge. We do however maintain that pugilistic encounters should not be put down upon the list of recreations.

Several Christians also called upon us to say that they had prayed for the reformation of base ball men, but to little effect. They seem to be of the opinion that neither prayer nor salt will save these men; that they are all on the highway to the bad place, and like the journey. Our Christian friends, however, do not intend to weary of well doing and will go on praying.

From ebook: “The First Decade of College Football: 300 Published Reports of American Football from 1869 to 1879